Forum Posts

gaynordickeson
Apr 30, 2019
In ABBA Forum
The next two weekends, 4-6 May (incl Bank holiday Monday) and 11-12 May is the Chichester Open Studios event. I welcome you to my shed at the bottom of the garden if you are interested in seeing me working; and you can also see my botanical artwork hung in the house for viewing and attended to by my husband Robin. The trail venues are open each day between 10:30 and 17:30. The address is: Saltings Windmill Field Bosham Nr. Chichester, West Sussex PO18 8LH All are very welcome. A tit-bit; My latest small piece of work. English native bluebell on vellum. PS: Bosham is well worth a day visit as it is a lovely village on the south coast where the local pub keeps pictures of cars forgotten to the tides. Also, there are quite a few artists participating in the trail, and as long as you come to see me first, I am sure they would love to see you too. email: gaynordickeson@mac.com
Chichester Open studios event; welcome to my studio - 54 content media
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gaynordickeson
Apr 29, 2019
In ABBA Forum
On our hike on the Sussex Downs, Friday last week, we visited the Cissbury Ring up from Findon. Fantastic views although storm clouds rolled in and the wind blew quite strongly. Found my first sight of Red Campion this year. Found also a Maple flowering. Does anyone know if the last picture is Big leaf Maple (Oregan Maple)?
Red Campion flowering near Findon, Worthing content media
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gaynordickeson
Apr 16, 2019
In ABBA Forum
The cowslips (Primula veris) can be seen at Hunter’s Race near Chichester. The Bluebells (Hyacinthoides non-scripta) and Lady’s Smock (Cardamine pratensis) were seen in and around the Stansted Forest near Rowland’s Castle.
Cowslips, Bluebells & Lady’s smock on the south coast content media
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gaynordickeson
Mar 28, 2019
In ABBA Forum
I am in the process of preparing to paint some Norwegian plants found in the Norwegian mountains. However, all are native to this country (the UK), although might be more rare. I am struggling with one plant in particular as I can't quite identify it. I have some photos here which the books tell me can be confused with each other. I know two of them very well and they are very distinct from each other. One is a Vaccinium oxycoccus - which everyone will know as a Cranberry - although in the shops they are from cultivars and therefore larger. The plant is long and trailing and found in very boggy areas. The leaf is very small 4-5 mm long. This one was found at 900m over sea level, but I have seen them lower down too. The next plant I also know very well too and is found in the same habitat as the Cranberry. It is Andromeda polifolia (named by Linnaeus). The common name is Bog Rosemary. The picture I have here shows it well ensconced in Sphagnum and together with Cloudberry and Bog Blueberry leaves.The leaf is a blue-green colour, and about 2 cm long. It is very narrow as the edges are furled inwards. The veins are very clear The plant I want to find out about is in the following picture. I haven't seen it in flower, but it is found in exactly the same area as the other two. The growing tip reminds me of the Cranberry, but far down it feels more woody. The leaf is in between the size of the Cranberry and the Bog Rosemary, shape reminds me of the Cranberry, but the veins remind me of the Bog Rosemary. I didn't mention that the leaf of the Cranberry doesn't have clear side veins, only the central one. Each of the plants have leaf edges that are curled under and all of them keep their foliage during the winter. Looking at this picture, the leaves look very similar in shape and form - but not size, to the Vaccinium vitas-idaea (Cowberry). It is not a Cowberry. Actually, the leaf lying across the plant at the front of the picture is Cranberry leaf. I would be very grateful if anyone knows what this plant is please. It will not be part of the series of pictures I am doing at the moment, but it just grates that I cannot seem to find out what it actually is.
Does anyone know what this plant is? content media
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